Most personal injury cases seem pretty similar on the surface. An individual is injured due to someone else’s negligence, and the injured is seeking compensation for their injuries. However, getting fair compensation can often be difficult. The insurance company’s idea of fair and our idea of fair are often worlds apart, which is why so many accident victims get a lawyer to handle their personal injury case. Most folks aren’t looking for a huge check for millions of dollars; they just want what they are entitled to. So how do you know what’s fair? Here are a few questions to ask yourself to determine whether the insurance company’s offer is fair or not.

  1. Will this settlement amount cover my future medical bills? Immediately following an accident, it’s next to impossible to know how much your medical treatment is going to cost, yet the insurance company wants you to make a decision on an amount right away. Ask your doctor to run an estimate of what follow-up visits and other treatments could cost. We’d be willing to wager it’s a lot more than the insurance company is offering.
  2. Does this amount also cover my lost wages? Chances are you can’t work if you’re seriously injured. How long will you be out of work? Every week you’re unable to pull a paycheck should be accounted for in your settlement. Again, run some numbers on what you stand to lose in paychecks and add that to your medical expenses.
  3. What is your suffering worth? We don’t need to tell you how much pain you’re in. You’re living it right now. What are those sleepless nights and agonizing days worth to you? Is it reflected in the insurance company’s settlement offer?

At Daniel Stark, we defend the rights of accident victims to fair compensation. Our clients know that we don’t settle for “good enough,” because our clients deserve better. If you’ve been injured, call a lawyer, whether it’s our firm or another. In our opinion, legal representation gives you the best chance of getting fair compensation and you deserve nothing less.

by Staff Blogger | April 26th, 2016